FEMALE SEXUAL PROBLEM

FEMALE SEXUAL PROBLEM

FEMALE SEXUAL PROBLEM

Persistent, recurrent problems with sexual response, desire, orgasm or pain — that distress you or strain your relationship with your partner — are known medically as female sexual dysfunction.

Many women experience problems with sexual function at some point. Female sexual dysfunction can occur at any stage of life. It can be lifelong or be acquired later in life. It can occur only in certain sexual situations or in all sexual situations.

Sexual response involves a complex interplay of physiology, emotions, experiences, beliefs, lifestyle and relationships. Disruption of any component can affect sexual desire, arousal or satisfaction, and treatment often involves more than one approach.

SYMPTOMS

SYMPTOMS

    Your symptoms will depend on the type or types of female sexual dysfunction you have:

    • Low sexual desire: This most common of female sexual dysfunctions involves a lack of sexual interest and willingness to be sexual.
    • Sexual arousal disorder: Your desire for sex might be intact, but you have difficulty with arousal or are unable to become aroused or maintain arousal during sexual activity.
    • Orgasmic disorder: You have persistent or recurrent difficulty in achieving orgasm after sufficient sexual arousal and ongoing stimulation.
    • Sexual pain disorder: You have pain associated with sexual stimulation or vaginal contact.

CAUSES

  • Physical: Many physical and/or medical conditions can cause problems with sexual function. These conditions include diabetes, heart disease, neurological diseases, hormonal imbalances, menopause, and chronic diseases such as kidney disease or liver failure, alcoholism and drug abuse. In addition, the side effects of certain medications, including some antidepressant drugs, can affect sexual desire and function.
  • Psychological and Social: Untreated anxiety or depression can cause or contribute to sexual dysfunction, as can long-term stress and a history of sexual abuse. The worries of pregnancy and demands of being a new mother may have similar effects.
  • Long-standing conflicts with your partner — about sex or other aspects of your relationship — can diminish your sexual responsiveness, as well. Cultural and religious issues and problems with body image also can contribute.